Size:  W 3 3/4″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a  green and blue shield shaped background.

$ 24.95

5307th Composite Unit (Provisional) ‘Merrills Marauders’

The 5307th Composite Unit (Provisional), known as ‘Merrill’s Marauders’ was a group of over 3,000 American volunteers, under the command of Brigadier General Frank Merrill. Their code name was ‘GALAHAD’.

They were a long range penetration unit, tasked with capturing Myitkyina airfield. This was the main Japanese base and only all-weather field in northern Burma, from which they launched attacks on US aircraft.

The Marauders treked 1,000-mile up the Ledo Road, hacking through the dense vegetation of the Himalayan foothills and in to Burma. And despite suffering extreme exhaustion, disease, running out of food and having to fight the enemy en route, they captured the airfield on May 17, 1944 – with no heavy artillery.

In August 1944 the unit was consolidated with the 475th Infantry, and in June 1954 was redesignated the 75th Infantry.

Size:  W 2 1/4″ x H 3 1/2″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a  red background.

$ 24.95

82nd Airborne Division

Originally formed in May 1918 as an infantry unit, the 82nd Airborne Division was reactivated in 1942 as an airborne division and fought in many of the major conflicts across Europe during WW2.  The ‘AA’ stood for ‘All American’ division.

In 1945 they discovered and liberated Wobbelin concentration camp in Germany.

Size:  W 5″ x H 5″

Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion on a  blue circle shaped background.

$ 26.95

756th Bombardment Squadron

The 756th Bombardment Squadron, one of four squadrons of the 459th Bombardment Group, flew long range bombing missions in the Mediterranean Theater of WW2.  They destroyed many key targets across Germany, disrupting its production of aircraft, munitions and essential supplies.

The 756th was deactivated in August 1945.

Size:  W 3″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion on a  blue shield shaped background.

$ 26.95

First Allied Airborne Army

The First Allied Airborne Army was formed in August 1944 to coordinate airborne operations and was made up of British, American and Polish troops.

They were heavily involved in the Allied advance in north west Europe and fought in Operation Market Garden, the Battle of the Bulge and in Operation Varsity.

The unit was disbanded in May 1945.

Size:  W 4 3/4″ x H 4 3/4″

Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion on a circle shaped background.

$ 24.99

459th Bombardment Group 

The 459th Bombardment Group was formed in  May 1943, and deployed to Giulia Airfield in Italy in July of that year.  Assigned to the Fifteenth Air Force, and equipped with B-24 Liberators, they carried out bombing missions across south and central Europe from their base in Italy, successfully destroying aircraft factories, munitions dumps, supply lines and other industrial targets.

The 459th was deactivated in August 1945.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion on a blue shield shaped background.

$ 24.99

344th Bombardment Group   Out of Stock

The 344th Bombardment Group was formed in August 1942, and deployed to RAF Stansted, England as part of the Ninth Air Force.  They were equipped with B-26 Martin Marauders and their nickname was the “Silver Streaks.”

There were four squadrons, the 494th, 495th, 496th and 497th and they attacked enemy supply routes, destroying bridges, ammunition dumps, airfields and railway lines.

During the Normandy landings, the 344th gave air support to troops at the Cotentin Peninsula and operating from bases in France and Belgium, they later took part in the Battle of the Falaise Pocket.

At the end of the war, the 344th Bombardment Group moved to a base at Schleissheim Palace, near Munich, Germany as part of the Allied Occupation Force, returning to the States in February 1946. They were deactivated in March of that year.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a red background.

$ 24.99

494th Bombardment Squadron

The 494th was formed in August 1942, as part of the 344th Bombardment Group, and deployed to RAF Stansted, England under the Ninth Air Force. They were equipped with B-26 Martin Marauder bombers.

They attacked enemy supply routes, destroying bridges, ammunition dumps, airfields and railway lines across northern France. And during the Normandy landings, the 494th gave air support to troops at the Cotentin Peninsula and were part of the major offensive on the city of Caen. From bases in France and Belgium, they later took part in the Battle of the Falaise Pocket.

At the end of the war, the 494th became part of the Allied Occupation Force based in Germany. In February 1946 they returned to the States and were deactivated in March.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a red circle shaped background.

$ 24.99

495th Bombardment Squadron

Formed in August 1942, as part of the 344th Bombardment Group, the 495th deployed to RAF Stansted, England under the Ninth Air Force. They were equipped with B-26 Martin Marauder bombers.

They attacked enemy supply routes, destroying bridges, ammunition dumps, airfields and railway lines across northern France. And during the Normandy landings, the 495th gave air support to troops at the Cotentin Peninsula and were part of the major offensive on the city of Caen.

From bases in France and Belgium, they later took part in the Battle of the Falaise Pocket. And at the end of the war, the 495th became part of the Allied Occupation Force based in Germany.

In February 1946 they returned to the States and were deactivated in March of that year.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a gold circle shaped background.

$ 24.99

497th Bombardment Squadron

Formed in August 1942, as part of the 344th Bombardment Group, the 497th deployed to RAF Stansted, England under the Ninth Air Force. They were equipped with B-26 Martin Marauder bombers.

They attacked enemy supply routes, destroying bridges, ammunition dumps, airfields and railway lines across northern France. And during the Normandy landings, the 497th gave air support to troops at the Cotentin Peninsula and were part of the major offensive on the city of Caen. From bases in France and Belgium, they later took part in the Battle of the Falaise Pocket.

At the end of the war, the 497th became part of the Allied Occupation Force based in Germany. and in February 1946 they returned to the States, where they were deactivated in March of that year.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 3 3/4″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a shield shaped background.

$ 24.99

327th Infantry Regiment

The 327th Infantry Regiment’s history goes back to 1917 and the First World War. But it was during WW2 that it became a Glider Infantry Regiment when reassigned to the newly formed 101st Airborne Division in August 1942.

On D-Day, 327th troops landed near Utah Beach. Along with the 4th Infantry Division their mission was to cut off the retreating German troops at Carentan.

They also took part in Operation Market Garden and the Battle of the Bulge in the Ardennes. And later fought in the Rhineland and Berchtesgarden Campaigns.

The 327th was deactivated in November 1945.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a black triangle shaped background.

$ 22.99

401st Fighter Squadron

The 401st Fighter Squadron was sent to RAF Aldermaston, England in February 1944 and flew combat missions across northern France in preparation for the D-Day landings. They were equipped with P-38 Lightnings and later converted to P-51 Mustangs.

They were part of the 370th Fighter Group, Ninth Air Force and took part in major offensives across France and Germany in the months after D-Day. They attacked German supply routes, radar stations, airfields and factories, supporting the Allied advance across Europe.

The 401st returned to the States in November 1945 and was deactivated.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a yellow circle  shaped background.

$ 18.99

402nd Fighter Squadron

The 402nd Fighter Squadron was activated on July 1st, 1943 and was part of the 370th Fighter Group.

The unit was assigned to the Ninth Air Force and flew combat missions across occupied France, destroying radar stations, flak units and supply depots.  They also flew escort to bombers attacking key targets in preparation for D-Day.

They were equipped with P-38 Lightnings and later converted to P-51 Mustangs.

The 402nd took part in major offensives across France and Germany in the months after D-Day. They attacked German supply routes, radar stations, airfields and factories, supporting the Allied advance across Europe.

The 402nd Fighter Squadron returned to the States in November 1945 and was deactivated.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a circle shaped background.

$ 19.99

485th Fighter Squadron

The 485th Fighter Squadron was formed in July 1943 as one of the units in the 370th Fighter Group.

Equipped with P-47s, P-38 Lightnings and later P-51 Mustangs, they flew armed reconnaissance missions over the Cotentin Peninsula in France, in the weeks leading up to D-Day.

Moving to an airfield in northern France, they flew air support for ground troops during the Battle of the Bulge and later during the move across the Rhine.

The 485th Fighter Squadron returned to the States in September 1945 and was deactivated in November.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a blue circle shaped background.

$ 25.99

351st Bomb Squadron

During WW2 the 351st Bomb Squadron was one of four in the 100th Bomb Group. They flew combat missions with the Eighth Air Force, from RAF Thorpe Abbotts in Norfolk, England.

Equipped with the B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bomber, the 351st regularly attacked naval facilities, industrial areas and airfields, deep inside Germany. But their slow speed made them easy targets for the faster Luftwaffe fighters and they lost many aircraft, with crews killed or made POWs.

The introduction of P-51 Mustang fighter escorts changed this. These aircraft had the range to fly with the B-17s and were a match for German Bf 109 and Fw 190 fighters.

The 351st Bomb Squadron was deactivated in December 1945.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a blue circle shaped background.

$ 25.99

349th Bomb Squadron

One of four squadrons in the 100th Bomb Group, the 349th Bomb Squadron moved to England in June 1943 and flew combat missions from RAF Thorpe Abbotts with the Eighth Air Force.

Flying B-17s, they attacked submarine pens and industrial areas deep in German territory. Although successful, these heavy bombers suffered massive losses during Luftwaffe attacks, and many aircrew were killed or crashed and the wounded became POWs.

But this changed with the introduction of P-51 Mustang fighter escorts, who had the range to fly into Germany alongside the B-17s.

The 349th Bomb Squadron was deactivated in December 1945.

Size:  W 2 1/2″ x H 2 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion  –  US Version

$ 21.99

$ 21.99

Size W 3″ x H 3″
Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion  –  UK Version

Eighth Air Force

During WW2 the U.S. Eighth Air Force was sent to England. From August 1942 until early 1944, their mission was to do as much damage to Germany’s supply lines as possible and cripple the German war machine. This was critical to reduce enemy forces before the Allied invasion of Normandy.

The climax of this mission was Operation Argument. Nicknamed “Big Week,” this was a coordinated attack on the German aircraft industry.   It took place during the last week in February, 1944 when the Eighth Air Force launched over 1,800 fighters and heavy bombers.

Flying alongside RAF squadrons of Spitfires and Mustangs, they attacked twelve German aircraft factories and several major supply installations.

Operation Argument caused so much damage to the German aircraft industry that their manufacturing plants were moved further East to try and avoid Allied attack.

The Eighth had three Air Divisions and each had four Combat Wings. During this period of operations across the European Theater, over 350,000 American officers and men served with the Mighty Eighth Air Force.

Size:  W 2 1/2″ x H 3 1/4″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 24.99

Size: W 5″ x H 5″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion

$ 26.99

101st Airborne Division – The Screaming Eagles

The 101st Airborne Division was originally created in July 1918 but then mothballed until reactivated in August 1942 in preparation for D-Day.  They moved to England in September 1943 and continued combat training.

Just before midnight on 6th June 1944, pathfinders from the 101st Airborne dropped into France.  This elite but maverick team were demolition-saboteurs and their mission was to prevent the Germans reinforcing beach heads before invasion troops arrived.  They were known as the Filthy Thirteen.

The 101st Airborne fought in all the WW2 battles including the D-Day landings, Operation Market Garden, Battle of the Bulge and served as occupation troops, accepting surrender from German troops and high-ranking Nazi officers.

The unit was deactivated in November 1945.

506th Parachute Infantry Regiment

The 506th PIR was a new experimental airborne regiment, created by the US Army during 1942.  The recruits endured weeks of tough PT, runs up Mt. Currahee, and night marches to get them up to the standard needed for jump school at Ft. Bening.

In June 1943, they were attached to the 101st Airborne Division and shortly after, they sailed to England where they continued training for the D-Day assault.

In the early hours of June 5th 1944, they boarded C-47 troop planes and headed across the English Channel and parachuted into occupied France.  They were part of Mission Albany, the initial night assault on Normandy.

Their task was to secure routes inland from Utah and Sword beaches for the invasion troops.

The 506th took part in the some of the toughest battles of Operation Overlord. And also Operation Market Garden – liberating the Netherlands – and the Battle of the Bulge, around Bastogne in Belgium.

In Nov 1945, the 506th PIR was deactivated.

Size:  W 3″ x H 3 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 23.99

Ninth Air Force

The 9th Air Force was activated in Sep 1941 and after moving to England as tactical air support across Europe, the 9th took part in the Allied Western Desert Campaign across North Africa and Egypt.

They gave air support to U.S. and British ground troops, in their fight against Rommel and his forces.

They also supported missions across Italy, took part in the Normandy invasion and were part of the Allied sweep across occupied France, resulting in victory over German forces.

The 9th was deactivated in December 1945.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 24.99

428th Fighter Squadron

The WW2 428th Fighter Squadron was part of the 9th Air Force based in Europe.  They were originally activated in August 1943 as a P-38 Lightning fighter squadron.

They flew combat missions across northern France attacking enemy airfields, military convoys, bridges and industrial installations.  They gave aerial cover to the invasion forces on D-Day and air support to US Army troops landing on the Normandy beaches.

When WW2 ended, they remained for a time as part of the Allied Occupation Force.

The 428th returned to the States in late 1945, where the unit was deactivated.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 24.99

429th Fighter Squadron

The 429th Fighter Squadron was a WW2 unit and part of the 9th Air Force based in Europe.

They were originally activated in August 1943 as a P-38 Lightning fighter squadron.

They flew combat missions across occupied France and took part in the D-Day landings, giving crucial air support to the troops on the Normandy beaches.

When WW2 ended, they remained for a time as part of the Allied Occupation Force, returning to the States in November 1945, where the unit was deactivated.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 24.99

430th Fighter Squadron

The 430th Fighter Squadron was a WW2 unit and part of the 9th Air Force based in Europe.  They were originally activated in August 1943 as a P-38 Lightning fighter squadron.

They flew combat missions across northern France and took part in the D-Day landings, giving air support to the troops on the beaches.

When WW2 ended, they remained for a time as part of the Allied Occupation Force.

In November 1945, the 430th returned to the States, where the unit was deactivated.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 26.95

474th Fighter Group

The 474th Fighter Group was formed in May 1943. After completing combat training on P-38 Lightnings in the Mojave Desert, they deployed to England as part of the Ninth Air Force.

They flew combat missions along the northern French coast, attacking key targets in preparation for Operation Overlord – the D-Day invasion of Normandy.

During 5/6 June, they gave aerial cover to the invasion force crossing the Channel and flew bombing missions to support troop landings.

They continued to support ground troops across France and Holland until the end of WW2, when they returned to the USA.

The 474th was deactivated in December 1945.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

354th Fighter Group

During WW2 the 354th Fighter Group was part of the USAAF Ninth Air Force, and flew bomber escort across the European theater, from their base at RAF Boxted, England.

They were part of the Normandy invasion, escorting gliders on D-Day and attacking ground targets.  And also gave air support during the attack on Holland, later that year.

They received Unit Citations for key aerial combat missions in WW2 and took part is most of the major battles and conflicts throughout the war.

The 354th Fighter Group was deactivated in May 1946.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

358th Fighter Squadron

The 358th Fighter Squadron was created in November 1942 and were part of the 355th Fighter Group. After training, the squadron moved to Europe in July 1943.  They operated under the Eighth Fighter Command, flying from bases across England.

They flew escort with B-17 and B-24 heavy bombers, on missions across Occupied Europe and deep into Germany, and the unit soon upgraded to long-distance P-51D Mustangs. They also carried out fighter sweeps across enemy airfields in Germany, destroying aircraft and supplies.

The unit remained active until the German surrender in May 1945 when the 358th became part of the military forces of occupation. In April 1946 they returned to the USA and were deactivated in November the same year.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

355th Fighter Squadron   Out of Stock

The WW2 355th Fighter Squadron was created in November 1942, as part of the 354th Fighter Group.  Their nickname was the ‘Pugnacious Pup.’

Led by Major George Bicknell, they moved overseas to RAF Boxted in England.  (USAAF Station AAF-150) and for a time flew combat missions across northern France.

However, in December 1943 their P-51B Mustangs were modified with the addition of extra fuel tanks, increasing their range to 1,300 miles.  This enabled them to fly escort for the B-24 heavy bombers on long-range missions into German territory.

Size:  W 3 3/4″ x H 4 1/4″

Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion.

$ 20.99

357th Fighter Squadron

The WW2 357th Fighter Squadron flew combat missions across Occupied Europe during the summer of 1943. They were equipped with Republic P-47 Thunderbolt fighters and were part of the 65th Fighter Wing, Eighth Air Force.

Their targets included enemy airfields, railways, bridges, communication stations and enemy convoys. And in April 1944, the squadron successfully attacked German airfields during a snow storm, earning a Distinguished Unit Citation.

During the D-Day landings in Normandy, the 357th provided air cover for the landing forces and later attacked several ground facilities, cutting off enemy supply lines.

They continued to fly combat missions across Europe until April 1945 when they relocated to AAF Station Gablingen in Germany as part of the Allied Occupation Force.

In November 1945 the 357th returned to the USA and was deactivated.

 

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

356th Fighter Squadron

The 356th was formed in November 1942 and led by veteran fighter pilot, Captain Charles Johnson.   They were part of the 354th Fighter Group.

Sadly, while training at Tonopah, Nevada, Captain Johnson was tragically killed testing a new P-39.  He was replaced by former Flying Tiger, Lt. Col. James Howard.

The 356th Fighter Squadron moved overseas to RAF Boxted in England and flew combat missions across Europe until May 145.  At the end of WW2, they remained in Germany as part of the Allied Occupying Force.

They nicknamed themselves the “Red Ass” squadron after the affliction suffered by many pilots on long-range flying missions.  Something pilots today will still agree with…

 

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

353rd Fighter Squadron

Nicknamed the ‘Fighting Cobras’, they were formed in November 1942 and after completing training, they deployed to RAF Boxted in England.  (USAAF Station AAF-150)

They initially flew combat missions across the English Channel into northern France and deep into Germany, in their P-51B Mustangs.  But in June 1944 they moved to Strip A-2 near Cricqueville, Normandy.

By the end of WW2 the squadron had 20 Aces, several unit citations and a final tally of 400 enemy aircraft destroyed and 162 damaged.

 

Size:  W 4 1/4″ x H 4 1/4″

Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

422nd Night Fighter Squadron

The patch of the 422nd Night Fighter squadron, 9th Air Force. The unit was formed in August 1943 and was the first to fly the new P-61 Black Widow bomber.

This was a Northrop-designed twin engine medium-range bomber that had three crew. It also had a secret weapon – radar in the nose of the aircraft which, with the help of radar-guidance ground controllers, helped them home in on their targets in the night skies.  Painted black and often flying with their instrument lights off,  the P-61 was almost invisible at night.

The 422nd moved to RAF Charmy Down in the U.K. in February 1944 where Lt. Herman Ernst claimed the first kill – a V1 rocket in the skies over England. The unit took part in the Battle of the Bulge and other major offensives and at the end of WW2 were part of the Allied occupation force. The 422nd returned to the U.S. in August 1945.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3″

Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

96th Bomb Squadron

The 96th Bomb Squadron was originally formed in 1917 and saw action across the Western Front in France during WW1.

During the Second World War, the 96th were part of the 2nd Bombardment Group and flew anti-submarine patrols along the mid-Atlantic coastline following the Pearl Harbor attack. Moving to European bases along the Mediterranean coast, they took part in the North Africa Campaign in April 1943 as part of the 12th Air Force.

They were later assigned to the 15th Air Force during the Italian Campaign, taking part in Operation Corkscrew when the Allies attacked the enemy garrison on the island of Pantilleria. The enemy surrendered and the Allies used the island as a tactical base during Operation Husky – the invasion of Sicily in the summer of 1943.

The 96th were part of many major offensives across occupied Europe and supported the Allied ground troops during Operation Dragoon – the Allied invasion of southern France in 1944. The 96th was deactivated in February 1946.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion./p>

$ 20.99

82nd Bombardment Squadron

The 82nd Bombardment Squadron was originally formed in early 1941 as a coastal patrol squadron. After Pearl Harbor it flew antisubmarine missions along the Gulf of Mexico.

In the summer of 1942 they were posted to RAF Deversoir in Egypt to support the British 8th Army’s advance during the Western Desert Campaign in North Africa.

The unit was posted to Italy in 1943 to fly escort for the US 5th Army during their Italian Campaign and in early 1944 they transferred to the China-Burma-India theater in the Pacific attacking Japanese transport routes and troop movements.

Size:  W 3 3/4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion./p>

$ 20.99

9th Photo Reconnaissance Squadron

The 9th Photo Reconnaissance Squadron (9th PRS) was originally formed in January 1942.

It carried out dangerous photographic reconnaissance and combat mapping missions across the China-Burma-India theater during the war in the Pacific.

The unit constantly flew over hostile territory, gathering invaluable military intelligence and they paid the price with many losses of planes and crew. But their work and the information they discovered played a critical role in the defeat of the Japanese.

The unit was deactivated in December 1945.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion

$ 20.99

332nd Fighter Group

This ‘Spit Fire’ patch was the insignia of the WW2 332nd Fighter Group – the elite Tuskegee Airmen.

The Group had four squadrons – the 99th, 100th, 301st and 302nd – and during WW2 ninety-six Distinguished Flying Crosses were awarded to pilots within this group.  The squadrons were also awarded Distinguished Unit Citations.

During WW2, flying their distinctive red-tailed P-51 Mustangs, they flew escort missions with U.S. heavy bombers, deep into enemy territory. Their widespread reputation for bringing their bombers home safely soon had these bomber crews asking for the ‘Red Tail Angels’ to fly escort with them.

In combat the Tuskegee airmen flew the P-39, P-40, P-47 and the P-51 and by the end of the war had flown over 1,200 missions.

The 332nd was deactivated in July 1949.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion./p>

$ 21.99

486th Fighter Squadron

The 486th Fighter Squadron was formed in September 1942 and assigned to the 352nd Fighter Group.

During WW2 the unit was based at RAF Bodney in England and carried out long-range escort missions across Europe.

They provided air cover during major offensives including the Normandy invasion and against enemy attacks in the Ardennes. And in 1944 the P-51 Mustangs of the 486th were part of Operation Titanic – the first shuttle bombing mission carried out from Russian bases operating alongside Russian Allies.

The unit was deactivated in November 1945 after the Second World War had ended.

Size:  W 3 1/2″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a yellow backing

$ 20.99

362nd Fighter Squadron Out of Stock

Unit patch of the 362nd Fighter Squadron, formed in December 1942 and assigned to the 357th Fighter Group.

During WW2 the 362nd was deployed to RAF Leiston in the south of England and from there, flying the P-51 Mustang, they flew escort for B-17 heavy bombers on missions across Europe. They also provided air support for Operation Market Garden and the Allied landings in Holland.

Many of the pilots were Aces and the group was nicknamed, “the Yoxford Boys” after a village near their RAF base.

Size:  W 3″ x H 3″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a blue and red background

$ 20.99

353rd Fighter Group

The 353rd Fighter Group was formed during WW2, in September 1942.  As part of the Allied force in Europe, the 353rd was posted to England under the command of the VIII Fighter Command.

They flew escort for U.S. heavy bombers, travelling deep into enemy territory and they also flew counter-air sweeps and strafing missions across France and northern Europe.

There were several Aces in the group and they received a Distinguished Unit Citation for their air support over Germany and the Netherlands during Operation Market Garden.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a circular background

$ 20.99

364th Fighter Squadron

One of three squadrons of the 357th Fighter Group, the 364th was formed in December 1942 and during WW2 was stationed at RAF Radon and then RAF Leiston in England.

As a combat fighter unit, they flew missions across the European theater and collectively the group was credited with almost 600 aerial combat victories and over 100 destroyed on the ground.

After the German surrender in 1945, the squadron became part of the U.S. Allied Occupation Force and was based for a short time in Germany.

Size:  W 2 3/4″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion on a black backing

$ 23.99

56th Fighter Group

Under the tenacious and inspiring leadership of Colonel Hubert “Hub” Zemke, the 56th Fighter Group, 8th Air Force was one of the most successful American Fighter units during WW2.

Also known as “Zemke’s Wolf Pack” the unit produced 39 aces. These elite pilots included the leading American aces of the European Theater, Francis “Gabby” Gabreski and Robert Samuel Johnson.

In October 1945 the 56th Fighter Group was deactivated but throughout the war in Europe the unit had established itself as the USAAF’s top fighter group.

Size:  W 3 1/2″ x H 3 1/2″ approx.
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion.

$ 19.99

61st Fighter Squadron

This was one of three squadrons of the 56th Fighter Group and was initially named the 61st Pursuit Squadron. They patrolled the Atlantic coastline, guarding against possible enemy attack after Pearl Harbor.

In January 1943 the 61st was posted to RAF King’s Cliffe in England. There they continued training on the new P-47 Thunderbolt and in April 1943 started operational missions across northern France.

After WW2 ended, the 61st returned to the USA and in October 1945 the unit was deactivated.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″ approx.
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion.

$ 20.99

62nd Fighter Squadron

Formed in late 1940 as the 62nd Pursuit Squadron the unit was one of three squadrons of the 56th Fighter Group. After the Pearl Harbor attack, the 62nd operated from several bases along the eastern seaboard protecting the coast from possible air attack.

In January 1943 the unit was posted to England and flew bomber escort across the European theater of WW2. During this period they earned two Distinguished Unit Citations.

In October 1945, the squadron was deactivated.

Size:  W 4″ x H 2″ approx.
Hand embroidered with silver and gold  wire bullion.

$ 19.99

63rd Fighter Squadron

Originally named the 63rd Pursuit Squadron, this was one of three squadrons  created in January 1941 as part of the 56th Pursuit Group.

In 1942 it was redesignated the 63d Fighter Squadron and was sent to England in January 1943.

Throughout WW2 the 63rd Fighter Squadron operated from several RAF bases, flying escort duties for US bombers across the European Theater.  During that time, the pilots destroyed 167 enemy aircraft in aerial combat and over 100 on the ground.

At the end of the war the squadron was deactivated in October 1945 but after several decades the squadron is once again active and based in Europe.

Size:  W 4 3/4″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver and gold  wire bullion on a blue background

$ 23.99

13th Aero Squadron

Meet Oscar.  Also known as, “The Devil’s Own Grim Reaper” and the insignia of the WW1 13th Aero Squadron.

This was a WW1 U.S. Army Pursuit Unit equipped with Spad XIII biplanes.  They provided close air support to bombers and reconnaissance groups operating on the Western Front.

At the end of the Great War the unit was decommissioned.  But at the beginning of WW2 it was re-activated and merged with other units to become the 13th Attack Squadron – later redesignated the 13th Bombardment Group.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a blue background

$ 21.99

487th FIGHTER SQUADRON

This unit was created in 1942 and led by Ace pilot, Lt. Colonel John C. Meyer.  During WW2 the 487th flew escort missions in their P-51D Mustangs, giving cover to U.S. heavy bombers operating across the European Theater.

As part of the 352nd Fighter Group, the squadron was deployed in Belgium in December 1944 to support Allied ground forces and took part in the Battle of the Bulge.

In 1945 at the end of the war, the 487th was deactivated.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a circular background

$ 20.99

328TH FIGHTER SQUADRON

During WW2, as part of the 352nd Fighter Group, the squadron was based at RAF Bodney in England and later at bases throughout Belgium.

They provided air support to Allied ground forces during the Battle of the Bulge and in the attack on the Rhine. And they also flew long range bomber escort, equipped with P-51 Mustang fighters.

The 328th was deactivated in the summer of 1945.

Size:  W 2 3/4″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion on a white background

$ 19.99

78TH FIGHTER GROUP

Formed in early 1942, the group was part of the Eighth Air Force stationed at RAF Duxford in England earning them the nickname, “the Duxford Eagles.”

They were later assigned to the Twelfth Air Force for missions in North Africa but returned to RAF Duxford in 1943.  During this time they achieved 338 aerial victories and 358 air-to-ground aircraft destroyed.

For a brief period after WWII the unit was based in Germany as part of the European Air Command.  And they later completed several combat missions in the Far East during the Korean War.  The 78th was finally deactivated in February 1961.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a yellow wool felt background

$ 19.99

2nd Battalion, 9th US Infantry Regiment, 2nd Division AEF

Formed in the late 1700s, this is one of the oldest and most decorated units in the US Army.  One of its first major deployments was during the Boxer Rebellion – when China tried to drive all foreigners out of the country.  This was where the regiment earned the nickname “Manchus.”

They went on to earn battle honors during the Great War and returned to the European theater during WWII taking part in the Battle of the Bulge and D-Day.

They continue to see action in many major offensives around the world up to the present day.

Size:  W 5″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion on a dark green wool felt background

$ 23.99

93RD AERO SQUADRON

The 93rd Aero Squadron was a U.S. Air Service Army Unit of WWI.   It was one of four squadrons that made up the 3rd Pursuit Group, First U.S. Army; the 28th, the 103rd (better known as Lafayette Escadrille) and the 213th.

During the Great War, flying SPAD XIIIs biplanes, the unit provided fighter escort to bomber and reconnaissance units over the Western Front.

It also had three Aces; Chester Ellis Wright, Leslie Rummel and Charles d’Olive with over 20 victories during aerial combat.  Although the unit was disbanded in 1919, a modified version of this insignia can be seen on the current 93rd Bomb Squadron.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver and gold wire bullion on a white wool felt background

$ 24.99

365TH FIGHTER-BOMBER GROUP

Also known as the “Hell Hawks” the 365th Fighter-Bomber Group was created in May 1943 and after training, flew combat missions from air bases in France, England and Germany.

As part of the U.S. 9th Air Force, they provided air support to
General Hodges’ First Army and to Patton’s Third Army.  They also took part in several major offensives in the European theater including the Battle of the Bulge and D-Day.

Size:  W 3″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 18.99

CBI CHINA-BURMA-INDIA  PATCH

Designated the CBI Theater, it was considered one of the “forgotten” theaters of war during WWII.

The CBI force was made up of thousands of USAAF servicemen from several units, initially under the command of General Joseph Stilwell.

Troops operating behind enemy lines relied on airdrops to survive and the transport pilots who regularly flew this dangerous route and kept vital supply lines open nicknamed it, “Flying the Hump” because of the mountainous terrain they had to negotiate.

Size:  W 5″ x H 5″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 19.99

VA-12 ATTACK SQUADRON

Established on May 12th, 1945 as Bomber Fighter Squadron 4, the VA-12 Attack Squadron was taken out of service on October 1st, 1986.

Attack Squadron 12, also known as the “Flying Ubangis” made more than thirty deployments aboard aircraft carriers, primarily flying A4 and A7s, including two combat tours in the Vietnam war.

Size:  W 5″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered in gold and silver wire bullion on a grey background.

$ 21.99

LAFAYETTE ESCADRLLE

This was the squadron insignia of the American volunteers – the Lafayette Escadrille – who flew with the French Aeronautique Militaire during WWI.

These pilots saw action over the Western Front from 1916-18, flying Voisin biplanes and Nieuports under the command of Georges Thenault.

The insignia is the second design of the Sioux Indian head originally created for the squadron by Harold Buckley Willis and painted on his aircraft fuselage.

Size:  W 1 1/2″ x H 1 1/4″ approx
Burnished metal lapel pin with single lock pin fastening on the back

$ 19.99

WW1 LAFAYETTE ESCADRLLE PIN Out of Stock

This is a collector’s replica of the pin that was given along with the Escadrille Lafayette service medal.

There were two versions of the service medal; one engraved ‘Lafayette Flying Corps’ and the other ‘Escadrille Lafayette.’

The medal and pin were created by Edmond-Emile Lindauer, a French designer and engraver of medals and coins.

95th PURSUIT SQUADRON

The “Kicking Mule” of the 95th Pursuit Squadron was the squadron’s original insignia of WWI.

In WWII members of this squadron, now renamed the 95th Bomber Squadron, took off from the USS Hornet and participated in the first raid on Tokyo as part of the Doolittle Raiders.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered in gold wire bullion on a blue wool felt background

$ 19.99

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 5 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a blue wool felt background

$ 20.99

74th FIGHTER SQUADRON “FLYING TIGERS”

The Flying Tigers was the nickname given by the Chinese to the 1st American Volunteer Group.

Under the command of Lieutenant General Claire Lee Chennault, the 14th US Air Force, 74th Fighter Squadron fought on behalf of Chinese and Burmese forces during the Japanese attack on Southeast Asia.

‘FLYING TIGERS’ WINGS

One of the variations of the gold wire bullion wings worn by the famous “Flying Tigers” aircrew.

Size:  W 3 1/2″ x H 3/4″
Hand embroidered in gold wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 18.99

Size:  W 3 1/2″ x H 7 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion and red silk thread on a dark brown leather background

$ 20.99

3rd PURSUIT SQUADRON

This is a WWII patch from the American Volunteer Group (AVG) the Flying Tigers.  This ‘Hell’s Angel” insignia belonged to the 3rd Pursuit Squadron.

The Flying Tigers had three squadrons: 1st (‘Adam & Eves’), 2nd (‘Panda Bears’) and the 3rd (‘Hell’s Angels’.)

Size: W 4″ x H 4″

Hand embroidered non-bullion patch on real smooth finish dark brown background.

$ 18.99

‘FLYING TIGERS’ AVG SQUADRON

This winged Bengal Tiger, leaping from a V for Victory was the insignia of the 1st American Volunteer Group of the Chinese Air Force in 1941.

They were commanded by Lt General Claire Lee Chennault and flew very distinctive shark faced P40C warhawks – a fighter and ground attack aircraft.

AVG “PEACOCK” PATCH

This is a reproduction of the AVG “Peacock” patch.  It’s actually a misnomer as the patch shows two eagles perched on a single arrow with their wings wrapped around each other signifying “camaraderie and cooperation”.

This fabulous patch was made especially for the AVG and was the official Chinese Air Force badge, given to a pilot for being a member of the Flying Tigers.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold wire bullion on a red wool felt background

$ 21.99

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a gold circular background

$ 20.99

27th AERO SQUADRON

This is the “Screaming Eagle“ patch of the WW1 27th Aero Squadron. It’s one of the oldest units in the US Air Force and it operated along the Western Front during the Great War.

Also the squadron of flying Ace Lt. Frank Luke, known as the “The Arizona Balloon Buster” for his daring feats against German observation balloons during the war.

He died after 18 victories and was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor.

The legacy of the 27th Aero Squadron continues today with the USAAF 27th Fighter Squadron.

WWI U.S. PILOT WINGS

Introduced in 1917, these were the first United States Army Air Service Pilot wings.

They were worn by WWI aircrew like Lt. Frank Luke,  and many high scoring aces including Eddie Rickenbacker, Jacques Swaab, Donald Hudson, Frederick Little and Alfred Grant.

Size:  W 3 1/2″ x H 1″
Hand embroidered in silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 18.99

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 19.99

94th AERO SQUADRON

The “Hat in the Ring” was the squadron insignia of the famous WWI 94th Aero Squadron. Three notable aces served in this group – Eddie Rickenbaker, Douglas Campbell & Raoul Lufbery.

 

363rd FIGHTER SQUADRON

Squadron patch of the 363rd Fighter Squadron, part of the 357th Fighter Group, Eighth Air Force who flew P-51 Mustangs during WWII.

During WWII the squadron was awarded two Distinguished Unit Citations for combat missions across Europe.

Chuck Yeager and Bud Anderson were members of this famous group.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a blue wool felt background

$ 19.99

Size:  W 4 3/4″ x H 4 3/4″
Hand embroidered in silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 19.99

341st BOMB GROUP

The “Burma Bridge Busters” as they were nicknamed,  operated in the China, Burma, and India theaters of WW2.  They flew B25 Mitchell Bombers and were part of the 10th Air Force.

345th BOMB GROUP ‘AIR APACHES’

The 345th Bomb Group was formed in November 1942.   Flying B25 Mitchell Bombers, the “Air Apaches” were the first Air Force combat group sent to the Pacific during WWII.

Soon after arriving, the planes were converted to strafers, making them a very effective low level ground and shipping attack aircraft.

Size:  W 5″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on dark wool background

$ 21.99

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 19.99

VMF-124 SQUADRON

This was a fighter squadron formed on September 2nd, 1942 and fully operational by December that year.

They arrived in Guadalcanal on February 12th, 1943 and were part of the Pacific Theater of WWII in the Solomon Islands.

The first F4U Pilot to be decorated with the Medal of Honor came from the VMF-124 squadron

VF-2 “RIPPERS” SQUADRON

This squadron was formed in June 1943 and saw action in the Pacific Theater.

Deployed aboard the USS Hornet, the VF-2 became the top fighter squadron in the Pacific with 28 confirmed Aces.

VF-2 Battle Sheet

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 21.99

319th TROOP CARRIER SQUADRON

The 319th TCS was assigned to the 1st Air Commando Glider Section and became operational in late 1944.  They gave air transport support to allied troops across the WWII China, Burma and India theater.

Originally an experimental group, it was a mix of fighters, transport aircraft, bombers and gliders.

The mule is holding a Kukri in its teeth, symbolizing the group’s work with the Chindits – a special operations force that worked deep behind enemy lines.

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 5″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a dark blue wool felt background

$ 19.99

Size:  W 4 1/2″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a white wool felt background

$ 18.99

6th FIGHTER SQUADRON, 1ST AIR COMMANDO
Out of Stock

This group was formed in March 1944 to provide fighter cover, bombardment and air transportation for Wingate’s Raiders in the China, Burma and India theater of operations.

Size:  W 4″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background

$ 19.99

VF-17 JOLLY ROGERS FIGHTER SQUADRON

The VF-17 Squadron, nicknamed ‘The Jolly Rogers’,  was established on January 1st, 1943 at NAS Norfolk.

Initially based on USS Bunker Hill, the unit saw combat as a land-based squadron in the Solomon Islands, from 1943-44, flying the F-4U Corsair.

This iconic squadron insignia came from the squadron commander, Lt. Cdr. Tom Blackburn’s wish to have an insignia that had a pirate theme.

VF-17 was the highest scoring Navy squadron of WWII.

351st BOMBARDMENT GROUP

This unit was stationed at RAF Polebrook, England and was part of the Eighth Air Force.  Their missions were primarily to hit industrial and manufacturing plants throughout Germany.

The unit was decommissioned in 1995.

This group was the unit to which actor Clark Gable was assigned during WWII.

Between May and September 1943, Captain Gable flew five combat missions, including one to Germany as an observer-gunner in a B17 Flying Fortress.

He was awarded the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross.

Size:  W 4″ x H 4 1/2″
Hand embroidered in gold wire bullion on a blue felt background

$ 24.99

The Military Place carefully researches each patch to achieve authentic replication of size and color. However, due to lack of official standardization during the era to which the patch relates, and variations found, some elements may differ from historical documentation. 

 

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